1932

Abstract

Gram-positive bacteria are prominent members of plant-associated microbial communities. Although many are hypothesized to be beneficial, some are causative agents of economically important diseases of crop plants. Because the features of Gram-positive bacteria are fundamentally different relative to those of Gram-negative bacteria, the evolution and ecology as well as the mechanisms used to colonize and infect plants also differ. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Gram-positive, plant-associated bacteria and provide a framework for future research directions on these important plant symbionts.

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2019-08-25
2024-07-15
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