1932

Abstract

Yellow dwarf viruses are the most economically important and widespread viruses of cereal crops. Although they share common biological properties such as phloem limitation and obligate aphid transmission, the replication machinery and associated -acting signals of these viruses fall into two unrelated taxa represented by and . Here, we explain the reclassification of these viruses based on their very different genomes. We also provide an overview of viral protein functions and their interactions with the host and vector, replication mechanisms of viral and satellite RNAs, and the complex gene expression strategies. Throughout, we point out key unanswered questions in virus evolution, structural biology, and genome function and replication that, when answered, may ultimately provide new tools for virus management.

[Erratum, Closure]

An erratum has been published for this article:
Erratum: Yellow Dwarf Viruses of Cereals: Taxonomy and Molecular Mechanisms
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2022-08-26
2024-04-24
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