1932

Abstract

This article reviews the literature on historical persistence in political science and the related social sciences. Historical persistence refers to causal effects that () operate over time scales of a decade or more and () explain spatial variation in political, economic, or social outcomes. Although political scientists have always drawn from history, the historical persistence literature represents a new approach to historical research in the social sciences that places a premium on credible research designs for causal inference. We discuss regional and national coverage, state-of-the-art research designs, analytical and inferential challenges, and mechanisms and theories of persistence, drawing broadly from the contemporary literature in political science and economics.

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2022-05-12
2024-04-14
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