1932

Abstract

Intragenerational mobility—persistent or secular upward or downward changes in individuals’ economic positions or occupational standing over their working lives—is intimately related both to intergenerational mobility and inequality as well as to labor market theories and behaviors. Careers are job sequences or patterns of mobility/immobility within and between occupations and organizations, the two major work structures that shape the opportunities available in the labor market. This article reviews research that links occupations and organizations to careers and intragenerational mobility. We emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of contributions to this topic and focus on integrating research by sociologists and economists. We also highlight cross-national research and emphasize the literatures that address questions related to social stratification and labor markets. Finally, we suggest fruitful areas for future research.

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2018-07-30
2024-06-19
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