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Abstract

Abstract

Much attention has been focused on the survival of Indigenous languages in recent years. Many, particularly anthropologists and linguists, anticipate the demise of the majority of Indigenous languages within this century and have called on the need to arrest the loss of languages. Opinions vary concerning the loss of language; some regard it as a hopeless cause, and others see language revitalization as a major responsibility of linguistics and kindred disciplines. To that end, this review explores efforts in language revitalization and documentation and the engagement with Indigenous peoples. It remains unclear why some attempts at language revitalization succeed, whereas others fail. What is clear is that the process is profoundly political.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.anthro.34.081804.120629
2005-10-21
2024-04-21
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.anthro.34.081804.120629
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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