1932

Abstract

Abstract

Suppressive soils hold considerable potential for managing soilborne pathogens. When the suppressiveness has a biological origin, identifying the causal organisms is the crucial step in realizing this potential. Armed with such knowledge, it may be possible to develop effective and sustainable pest management strategies through application of these organisms or agronomic practices that influence their population densities. This chapter focuses on the development and utilization of a population-based approach for identifying microorganisms involved in specific pathogen suppression. Key experimental design principles of the approach are explored by examining experiments characterizing the biological nature of take-all decline. We also describe how this approach was used to identify microorganisms that suppress the sugarbeet cyst nematode. Additional experimental design considerations and future directions for such investigations are also discussed.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.phyto.45.062806.094354
2007-09-08
2024-06-19
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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