1932

Abstract

Starting with the influences of having a father who was an agricultural plant pathologist, I sketch my career through university and research institute from field epidemiology, basic virus characterization to molecular biology. I note what I consider to be the highlights of my scientific career and the events that shaped the development of my thinking. These include secondment to teach in a university in Uganda, a sabbatical year in the University of California, Davis, where I became aware of the emerging DNA technology, studying the molecular biology of , rice tungro viruses, and with the aim of developing diagnostics and approaches to control of viruses. Bringing these experiences together, I am now involved in facilitating the uptake of the application of biotechnology to crop improvement in developing countries. I conclude with some thoughts on opportunities for young plant pathologists over the next years of rapid change. As I am one of the few British scientists who have had the honor of writing such an article, I also note some of the vagaries of the British system.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.phyto.46.110807.094143
2008-09-08
2024-04-16
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Literature Cited

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  • Article Type: Review Article
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