1932

Abstract

Ninety-four years have passed since the discovery of the Raman effect, and there are currently more than 25 different types of Raman-based techniques. The past two decades have witnessed the blossoming of Raman spectroscopy as a powerful physicochemical technique with broad applications within the life sciences. In this review, we critique the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for quantitative metabolomics. We overview recent developments of Raman spectroscopy for identification and quantification of disease biomarkers in liquid biopsies, with a focus on the recent advances within surface-enhanced Raman scattering–based methods. Ultimately, we discuss the applications of imaging modalities based on Raman scattering as label-free methods to study the abundance and distribution of biomolecules in cells and tissues, including mammalian, algal, and bacterial cells.

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2021-07-27
2024-06-16
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