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Abstract

Biomaterials as we know them today had their origins in the late 1940s with off-the-shelf commercial polymers and metals. The evolution of materials for medical applications from these simple origins has been rapid and impactful. This review relates some of the early history; addresses concerns after two decades of development in the twenty-first century; and discusses how advanced technologies in both materials science and biology will address concerns, advance materials used at the biointerface, and improve outcomes for patients.

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2019-06-04
2024-04-19
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