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Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the brain characterized by the impairment of the nigrostriatal system. This impairment leads to specific motor manifestations (i.e., bradykinesia, tremor, and rigidity) that are assessed through clinical examination, scales, and patient-reported outcomes. New sensor-based and wearable technologies are progressively revolutionizing PD care by objectively measuring these manifestations and improving PD diagnosis and treatment monitoring. However, their use is still limited in clinical practice, perhaps because of the absence of external validation and standards for their continuous use at home. In the near future, these systems will progressively complement traditional tools and revolutionize the way we diagnose and monitor patients with PD.

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2019-06-04
2024-04-14
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