1932

Abstract

Our review in the 2008 volume of this journal detailed the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) for treatment of heart failure (HF). MCS initially utilized bladder-based blood pumps generating pulsatile flow; these pulsatile flow pumps have been supplanted by rotary blood pumps, in which cardiac support is generated via the high-speed rotation of computationally designed blading. Different rotary pump designs have been evaluated for their safety, performance, and efficacy in clinical trials both in the United States and internationally. The reduced size of the rotary pump designs has prompted research and development toward the design of MCS suitable for infants and children. The past decade has witnessed efforts focused on tissue engineering–based therapies for the treatment of HF. This review explores the current state and future opportunities of cardiac support therapies within our larger understanding of the treatment options for HF.

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2019-06-04
2024-06-20
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