1932

Abstract

Accompanying the increasing translational impact of immunotherapeutic strategies to treat and prevent disease has been a broadening interest across both bioscience and bioengineering in the lymphatic system. Herein, the lymphatic system physiology, ranging from its tissue structures to immune functions and effects, is described. Design principles and engineering approaches to analyze and manipulate this tissue system in nanoparticle-based drug delivery applications are also elaborated.

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2023-06-08
2024-06-16
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