1932

Abstract

The author first describes his childhood in the South and the ways in which it fostered the values he has espoused throughout his life, his development of a keen fascination with science, and the influences that supported his progress toward higher education. His experiences in ROTC as a student, followed by two years in the US Army during the Vietnam War, honed his leadership skills. The bulk of the autobiography is a chronological journey through his scientific career, beginning with arrival at the University of California, Irvine in 1972, with an emphasis on the postdoctoral students and colleagues who have contributed substantially to each phase of his lab's progress. White's fundamental findings played a key role in the development of membrane biophysics, helping establish it as fertile ground for research. A story gradually unfolds that reveals the deeply collaborative and painstakingly executed work necessary for a successful career in science.

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2023-05-09
2024-04-13
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