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Abstract

Imaging techniques greatly facilitate the comprehensive knowledge of biological systems. Although imaging methodology for biomacromolecules such as protein and nucleic acids has been long established, microscopic techniques and contrast mechanisms are relatively limited for small biomolecules, which are equally important participants in biological processes. Recent developments in Raman imaging, including both microscopy and tailored vibrational tags, have created exciting opportunities for noninvasive imaging of small biomolecules in living cells, tissues, and organisms. Here, we summarize the principle and workflow of small-biomolecule imaging by Raman microscopy. Then, we review recent efforts in imaging, for example, lipids, metabolites, and drugs. The unique advantage of Raman imaging has been manifested in a variety of applications that have provided novel biological insights.

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2019-05-06
2024-06-18
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