1932

Abstract

High hydrostatic pressure affects the structure, dynamics, and stability of biomolecular systems and is a key parameter in the context of the exploration of the origin and the physical limits of life. This review lays out the conceptual framework for exploring the conformational fluctuations, dynamical properties, and activity of biomolecular systems using pressure perturbation. Complementary pressure-jump relaxation studies are useful tools to study the kinetics and mechanisms of biomolecular phase transitions and structural transformations, such as membrane fusion or protein and nucleic acid folding. Finally, the advantages of using pressure to explore biomolecular assemblies and modulate enzymatic reactions are discussed.

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2019-05-06
2024-06-13
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