1932

Abstract

In the global health emergency caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), efficient and specific therapies are urgently needed. Compared with traditional small-molecular drugs, antibody therapies are relatively easy to develop; they are as specific as vaccines in targeting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2); and they have thus attracted much attention in the past few months. This article reviews seven existing antibodies for neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 with 3D structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Five 3D antibody structures associated with the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein are also evaluated for their potential in neutralizing SARS-CoV-2. The interactions of these antibodies with the S protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) are compared with those between angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and RBD complexes. Due to the orders of magnitude in the discrepancies of experimental binding affinities, we introduce topological data analysis, a variety of network models, and deep learning to analyze the binding strength and therapeutic potential of the 14 antibody–antigen complexes. The current COVID-19 antibody clinical trials, which are not limited to the S protein target, are also reviewed.

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2021-05-06
2024-04-15
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