1932

Abstract

The study of membrane proteins and receptors presents many challenges to researchers wishing to perform biophysical measurements to determine the structure, function, and mechanism of action of such components. In most cases, to be fully functional, proteins and receptors require the presence of a native phospholipid bilayer. In addition, many complex multiprotein assemblies involved in cellular communication require an integral membrane protein as well as a membrane surface for assembly and information transfer to soluble partners in a signaling cascade. Incorporation of membrane proteins into Nanodiscs renders the target soluble and provides a native bilayer environment with precisely controlled composition of lipids, cholesterol, and other components. Likewise, Nanodiscs provide a surface of defined area useful in revealing lipid specificity and affinities for the assembly of signaling complexes. In this review, we highlight several biophysical techniques made possible through the use of Nanodiscs.

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2018-05-20
2024-06-14
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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