1932

Abstract

Rhodopsin is the photoreceptor in human rod cells responsible for dim-light vision. The visual receptors are part of the large superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate signal transduction in response to diverse diffusible ligands. The high level of sequence conservation within the transmembrane helices of the visual receptors and the family A GPCRs has long been considered evidence for a common pathway for signal transduction. I review recent studies that reveal a comprehensive mechanism for how light absorption by the retinylidene chromophore drives rhodopsin activation and highlight those features of the mechanism that are conserved across the ligand-activated GPCRs.

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2023-05-09
2024-06-13
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