1932

Abstract

The advent of biotechnology has enabled metabolic engineers to assemble heterologous pathways in cells to produce a variety of products of industrial relevance, often in a sustainable way. However, many pathways face challenges of low product yield. These pathways often suffer from issues that are difficult to optimize, such as low pathway flux and off-target pathway consumption of intermediates. These issues are exacerbated by the need to balance pathway flux with the health of the cell, particularly when a toxic intermediate builds up. Nature faces similar challenges and has evolved spatial organization strategies to increase metabolic pathway flux and efficiency. Inspired by these strategies, bioengineers have developed clever strategies to mimic spatial organization in nature. This review explores the use of spatial organization strategies, including protein scaffolding and protein encapsulation inside of proteinaceous shells, toward overcoming bottlenecks in metabolic engineering efforts.

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2023-05-09
2024-06-14
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