1932

Abstract

Cooperativity is a hallmark of protein folding, but the thermodynamic origins of cooperativity are difficult to quantify. Tandem repeat proteins provide a unique experimental system to quantify cooperativity due to their internal symmetry and their tolerance of deletion, extension, and in some cases fragmentation into single repeats. Analysis of repeat proteins of different lengths with nearest-neighbor Ising models provides values for repeat folding () and inter-repeat coupling (Δ). In this article, we review the architecture of repeat proteins and classify them in terms of Δ and Δ; this classification scheme groups repeat proteins according to their degree of cooperativity. We then present various statistical thermodynamic models, based on the 1D-Ising model, for analysis of different classes of repeat proteins. We use these models to analyze data for highly and moderately cooperative and noncooperative repeat proteins and relate their fitted parameters to overall structural features.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-biophys-102220-083020
2021-05-06
2024-06-25
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