1932

Abstract

An ideal biosensor material at room temperature, with an extremely large surface area per unit mass combined with the possibility of harnessing quantum mechanical attributes, would be comprised of graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials. The sensing of a variety of sizes and types of biomolecules involves modulation of the electrical charge density of (current through) the 2D material and manifests through specific components of the capacitance (resistance). While sensitive detection at the single-molecule level, i.e., at zeptomolar concentrations, may be achieved, specificity in a complex mixture is more demanding. Attention should be paid to the influence of inevitably present defects in the 2D materials on the sensing, as well as calibration of obtained results with acceptable standards. The consequent establishment of a roadmap for the widespread deployment of 2D material–based biosensors in point-of-care platforms has the potential to revolutionize health care.

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2023-05-09
2024-06-13
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