1932

Abstract

Nanoparticle-based systems offer fascinating possibilities for biomedicine, but their translation into clinics is slow. Missing sterile, reproducible, and scalable methods for their synthesis along with challenges in characterization and poor colloidal stability of nanoparticles in body fluids are key obstacles. Flame aerosol technology gives proven access to scalable synthesis of nanoparticles with diverse compositions and architectures. Although highly promising in terms of product reproducibility and sterility, this technology is frequently overlooked, as its products are of fractal-like aggregated and/or agglomerated morphology. However, coagulation is a widely occurring phenomenon in all kinds of particle-based systems. In particular, protein-rich body fluids encountered in biomedical settings often lead to destabilization of colloidal nanoparticle suspensions in vivo. We aim to provide insights into how particle–particle interactions can be measured and controlled. Moreover, we show how particle coupling effects driven by coagulation may even be beneficial for certain sensing, therapeutic, and bioimaging applications.

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2019-06-07
2024-06-13
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