1932

Abstract

Whole-animal experiments devised to investigate possible association between photoperiodic time measurement and the circadian system (Bünning's hypothesis) are compared with more recent molecular investigations of circadian clock genes. In and some other species, experimental cycles of light and darkness revealed a photoperiodic oscillator, set to constant phase at dusk and measuring night length repeatedly during extended periods of darkness. In some species, however, extreme dampening revealed an unrepetitive (i.e., hourglass-like) response. Rhythms of clock gene transcript abundance may also show similar phase relationships to the light cycle, and gene silencing of important clock genes indicates that they play a crucial role in photoperiodism either alone or in concert. However, the multiplicity of peripheral oscillators in the insect circadian system indicates that more complex mechanisms might also be important.

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2020-01-07
2024-06-21
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