1932

Abstract

Inborn genetic differences in chemosensory receptors can lead to differences in perception and preference for foods and beverages. These differences can drive market segmentation for food products as well as contribute to nutritional status. This knowledge may be essential in the development of foods and beverages because the sensory profiles may not be experienced in the same way across individuals. Rather, distinct consumer groups may exist with different underlying genetic variations. Identifying genetic factors associated with individual variability can help better meet consumer needs through an enhanced understanding of perception and preferences. This review provides an overview of taste and chemesthetic sensations and their receptors, highlighting recent advances linking genetic variations in chemosensory genes to perception, food preference and intake, and health. With growing interest in personalized foods, this information is useful for both food product developers and nutrition health professionals alike.

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2020-03-25
2024-06-21
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