1932

Abstract

Life expectancy has dramatically increased over the past 200 years, but modern life factors such as environmental exposure, antibiotic overuse, C-section deliveries, limited breast-feeding, and diets poor in fibers and microbes could be associated with the rise of noncommunicable diseases such as overweight, obesity, diabetes, food allergies, and colorectal cancer as well as other conditions such as mental disorders. Microbial interventions that range from transplanting a whole undefined microbial community from a healthy gut to an ill one, e.g., so-called fecal microbiota transplantation or vaginal seeding, to the administration of selected well-characterized microbes, either live (probiotics) or not (postbiotics), with efficacy demonstrated in clinical trials, may be effective tools to treat or prevent acute and chronic diseases that humans still face, enhancing the quality of life.

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2022-03-25
2024-04-24
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