1932

Abstract

The recent COVID-19 pandemic drastically affected food supply chains worldwide, showing the vulnerability of food security. Efforts to develop alternative protein sources that are sustainable and can help alleviate global food shortage problems should be prioritized. Insects have been part of our diet for thousands of years and still are today, and market trends show a global increase in the number of food-grade insect producers. The global market for edible insects has been forecasted to reach US$8 billion by the year 2030. Insects are highly nutritious and have bioactive peptides with potential therapeutic effects. This review provides an overview of the consumption of insects from ancient to modern times, discusses the rationale for using insects as alternative protein sources, and presents a summary of the major insects consumed worldwide as well as a brief description of the traditional and novel technologies currently used to process insects and/or extract their nutritional components.

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2022-03-25
2024-04-19
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