1932

Abstract

Germ cells are the only cell type that is capable of transmitting genetic information to the next generation, which has enabled the continuation of multicellular life for the last 1.5 billion years. Surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms supporting the germline's remarkable ability to continue in this eternal cycle, termed germline immortality. Even unicellular organisms age at a cellular level, demonstrating that cellular aging is inevitable. Extensive studies in yeast have established the framework of how asymmetric cell division and gametogenesis may contribute to the resetting of cellular age. This review examines the mechanisms of germline immortality—how germline cells reset the aging of cells—drawing a parallel between yeast and multicellular organisms.

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2023-11-27
2024-06-17
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