1932

Abstract

Bacteria often encounter temperature fluctuations in their natural habitats and must adapt to survive. The molecular response of bacteria to sudden temperature upshift or downshift is termed the heat shock response (HSR) or the cold shock response (CSR), respectively. Unlike the HSR, which activates a dedicated transcription factor that predominantly copes with heat-induced protein folding stress, the CSR is mediated by a diverse set of inputs. This review provides a picture of our current understanding of the CSR across bacteria. The fundamental aspects of CSR involved in sensing and adapting to temperature drop, including regulation of membrane fluidity, protein folding, DNA topology, RNA metabolism, and protein translation, are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on recent findings of a CSR circuitry in mediated by cold shock family proteins and RNase R that monitors and modulates messenger RNA structure to facilitate global translation recovery during acclimation.

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2021-11-23
2024-06-17
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