1932

Abstract

The battle for survival between bacteria and bacteriophages (phages) is an arms race where bacteria develop defenses to protect themselves from phages and phages evolve counterstrategies to bypass these defenses. CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems represent a widespread mechanism by which bacteria protect themselves from phage infection. In response to CRISPR-Cas, phages have evolved protein inhibitors known as anti-CRISPRs. Here, we describe the discovery and mechanisms of action of anti-CRISPR proteins. We discuss the potential impact of anti-CRISPRs on bacterial evolution, speculate on their evolutionary origins, and contemplate the possible next steps in the CRISPR-Cas evolutionary arms race. We also touch on the impact of anti-CRISPRs on the development of CRISPR-Cas-based biotechnological tools.

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2018-11-23
2024-06-20
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