1932

Abstract

Compared with terrestrial ecosystems, marine ecosystems have a higher proportion of heterotrophic biomass. Building from this observation, we define the North Atlantic biome as the region where the large, lipid-rich copepod is the dominant mesozooplankton species. This species is superbly adapted to take advantage of the intense pulse of productivity associated with the North Atlantic spring bloom. Most of the characteristic North Atlantic species, including cod, herring, and right whales, rely on either directly or indirectly. The notion of a biome rests inherently on an assumption of stability, yet conditions in the North Atlantic are anything but stable. Humans have reduced the abundance of many fish and whales (though some recovery is underway). Humans are also introducing physical and chemical trends associated with global climate change. Thus, the future of the North Atlantic depends on the biome's newest species, .

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2020-01-03
2024-04-17
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