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Abstract

We present a comprehensive review of recent developments in the field of chiral plasmonics. Significant advances have been made recently in understanding the working principles of chiral plasmonic structures. With advances in micro- and nanofabrication techniques, a variety of chiral plasmonic nanostructures have been experimentally realized; these tailored chiroptical properties vastly outperform those of their molecular counterparts. We focus on chiral plasmonic nanostructures created using bottom-up approaches, which not only allow for rational design and fabrication but most intriguingly in many cases also enable dynamic manipulation and tuning of chiroptical responses. We first discuss plasmon-induced chirality, resulting from the interaction of chiral molecules with plasmonic excitations. Subsequently, we discuss intrinsically chiral colloids, which give rise to optical chirality owing to their chiral shapes. Finally, we discuss plasmonic chirality, achieved by arranging achiral plasmonic particles into handed configurations on static or active templates. Chiral plasmonic nanostructures are very promising candidates for real-life applications owing to their significantly larger optical chirality than natural molecules. In addition, chiral plasmonic nanostructures offer engineerable and dynamic chiroptical responses, which are formidable to achieve in molecular systems. We thus anticipate that the field of chiral plasmonics will attract further widespread attention in applications ranging from enantioselective analysis to chiral sensing, structural determination, and in situ ultrasensitive detection of multiple disease biomarkers, as well as optical monitoring of transmembrane transport and intracellular metabolism.

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2019-06-14
2024-04-17
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