1932

Abstract

Recent experiments using optogenetic tools facilitate the identification and functional analysis of thirst neurons and vasopressin-producing neurons. Four major advances provide a detailed anatomy and physiology of thirst, taste for water, and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) release: () Thirst and AVP release are regulated by the classical homeostatic, interosensory plasma osmolality negative feedback as well as by novel, exterosensory, anticipatory signals. These anticipatory signals for thirst and vasopressin release concentrate on the same homeostatic neurons and circumventricular organs that monitor the composition of blood. () Acid-sensing taste receptor cells (TRCs) expressing otopetrin 1 on type III presynaptic TRCs on the tongue, which were previously suggested as the sour taste sensors, also mediate taste responses to water. () Dehydration is aversive, and median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) neuron activity is proportional to the intensity of this aversive state. () MnPOGLP1R neurons serve as a central detector that discriminates fluid ingestion from solid ingestion, which promotes acute satiation of thirst through the subfornical organ and other downstream targets.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-physiol-020518-114556
2019-02-10
2024-04-23
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