1932

Abstract

Interoception, the ability to precisely and timely sense internal body signals, is critical for life. The interoceptive system monitors a large variety of mechanical, chemical, hormonal, and pathological cues using specialized organ cells, organ innervating neurons, and brain sensory neurons. It is important for maintaining body homeostasis, providing motivational drives, and regulating autonomic, cognitive, and behavioral functions. However, compared to external sensory systems, our knowledge about how diverse body signals are coded at a system level is quite limited. In this review, we focus on the unique features of interoceptive signals and the organization of the interoceptive system, with the goal of better understanding the coding logic of interoception.

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2024-02-12
2024-04-25
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