1932

Abstract

Inflammation-adapted hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have long been appreciated as key drivers of emergency myelopoiesis, thereby enabling the bone marrow to meet the elevated demand for myeloid cell generation under various stress conditions, such as systemic infection, inflammation, or myelosuppressive insults. In recent years, HSPC adaptations were associated with potential involvement in the induction of long-lived trained immunity and the emergence of clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). Whereas trained immunity has context-dependent effects, protective in infections and tumors but potentially detrimental in chronic inflammatory diseases, CHIP increases the risk for hematological neoplastic disorders and cardiometabolic pathologies. This review focuses on the inflammatory regulation of HSPCs in the aforementioned processes and discusses how modulation of HSPC function could lead to novel therapeutic interventions.

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2022-02-10
2024-04-23
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