1932

Abstract

The role of β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) in adipose tissue to promote lipolysis and the release of fatty acids and nonshivering thermogenesis in brown fat has been studied for so many decades that one would think there is nothing left to discover. With the rediscovery of brown fat in humans and renewed interest in UCP1 and uncoupled mitochondrial respiration, it seems that a review of adipose tissue as an organ, pivotal observations, and the investigators who made them would be instructive to understanding where the field stands now. The discovery of the β-adrenergic receptor was important for accurately defining the pharmacology of the adipocyte, while the clinical targeting of this receptor for obesity and metabolic disease has had its highs and lows. Many questions still remain about how βARs regulate adipocyte metabolism and the signaling molecules through which they do it.

Keyword(s): adiposecAMPkinasesobesitysignaling
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2022-02-10
2024-06-13
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