1932

Abstract

In mammalian cardiac myocytes, the plasma membrane includes the surface sarcolemma but also a network of membrane invaginations called transverse (t-) tubules. These structures carry the action potential deep into the cell interior, allowing efficient triggering of Ca2+ release and initiation of contraction. Once thought to serve as rather static enablers of excitation-contraction coupling, recent work has provided a newfound appreciation of the plasticity of the t-tubule network's structure and function. Indeed, t-tubules are now understood to support dynamic regulation of the heartbeat across a range of timescales, during all stages of life, in both health and disease. This review article aims to summarize these concepts, with consideration given to emerging t-tubule regulators and their targeting in future therapies.

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2022-02-10
2024-04-24
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