1932

Abstract

Fire blight, caused by the bacterial phytopathogen , is an economically important and mechanistically complex disease that affects apple and pear production in most geographic production hubs worldwide. We compile, assess, and present a genetic outlook on the progression of an infection in the host. We discuss the key aspects of type III secretion–mediated infection and systemic movement, biofilm formation in xylem, and pathogen dispersal via ooze droplets, a concentrated suspension of bacteria and exopolysaccharide components. We present an overall outlook on the genetic elements contributing to pathogenesis, including an exploration of the impact of floral microbiomes on colonization, and summarize the current knowledge of host responses to an incursion and how this response stimulates further infection and systemic spread. We hope to facilitate the identification of new, unexplored areas of research in this pathosystem that can help identify evolutionarily susceptible genetic targets to ultimately aid in the design of sustainable strategies for fire blight disease mitigation.

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2021-08-25
2024-05-22
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