1932

Abstract

Bacterial spot is an endemic seedborne disease responsible for recurring outbreaks on tomato and pepper around the world. The disease is caused by four diverse species, , , , and There are no commercially available disease-resistant tomato varieties, and the disease is managed by chemical/biological control options, although these have not reduced the incidence of outbreaks. The disease on peppers is managed by disease-resistant cultivars that are effective against but not . A significant shift in composition and prevalence of different species and races of the pathogen has occurred over the past century. Here, I attempt to review ecological and evolutionary processes associated with the population dynamics leading to disease emergence and spread. The goal of this review is to integrate the knowledge on population genomics and molecular plant–microbe interactions for this pathosystem to tailor disease management strategies.

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2021-08-25
2024-06-16
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