1932

Abstract

Peptide signaling is an emerging paradigm in molecular plant–microbe interactions with vast implications for our understanding of plant–nematode interactions and beyond. Plant-like peptide hormones, first discovered in cyst nematodes, are now recognized as an important class of peptide effectors mediating several different types of pathogenic and symbiotic interactions. Here, we summarize what has been learned about nematode-secreted CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-RELATED (CLE) peptide effectors since the last comprehensive review on this topic a decade ago. We also highlight new discoveries of a diverse array of peptide effectors that go beyond the CLE peptide effector family in not only phytonematodes but in organisms beyond the phylum Nematoda.

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2022-08-26
2024-04-19
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