1932

Abstract

Bacterial diseases are a constant threat to crop production globally. Current management strategies rely on an array of tactics, including improved cultural practices; application of bactericides, plant activators, and biocontrol agents; and use of resistant varieties when available. However, effective management remains a challenge, as the longevity of deployed tactics is threatened by constantly changing bacterial populations. Increased scrutiny of the impact of pesticides on human and environmental health underscores the need for alternative solutions that are durable, sustainable, accessible to farmers, and environmentally friendly. In this review, we discuss the strengths and shortcomings of existing practices and dissect recent advances that may shape the future of bacterial disease management. We conclude that disease resistance through genome modification may be the most effective arsenal against bacterial diseases. Nonetheless, more research is necessary for developing novel bacterial disease management tactics to meet the food demand of a growing global population.

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2022-08-26
2024-06-16
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