1932

Abstract

The plant cytoskeleton is a dynamic framework of cytoplasmic filaments that rearranges as the needs of the cell change during growth and development. Incessant turnover mechanisms allow these networks to be rapidly redeployed in defense of host cytoplasm against microbial invaders. Both chemical and mechanical stimuli are recognized as danger signals to the plant, and these are perceived and transduced into cytoskeletal dynamics and architecture changes through a collection of well-recognized, previously characterized players. Recent advances in quantitative cell biology approaches, along with the powerful molecular genetics techniques associated with , have uncovered two actin-binding proteins as key intermediaries in the immune response to phytopathogens and defense signaling. Certain bacterial phytopathogens have adapted to the cytoskeletal-based defense mechanism during the basal immune response and have evolved effector proteins that target actin filaments and microtubules to subvert transcriptional reprogramming, secretion of defense-related proteins, and cell wall–based defenses. In this review, we describe current knowledge about host cytoskeletal dynamics operating at the crossroads of the molecular and cellular arms race between microbes and plants.

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2018-08-25
2024-06-18
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