1932

Abstract

Wood-based bioenergy development could play a vital role in attaining energy independence, reducing carbon emissions, and ensuring rural prosperity in the United States. An understanding of policies supporting wood-based bioenergy development coupled with the current status of production of various wood-based bioenergy products would better the prospects of wood-based bioenergy development in the United States. An understanding of the economic feasibility, social acceptability, and environmental externalities would contribute to effective policy prescriptions for establishing the US bioeconomy. Based on a comprehensive review of existing studies, we show that the heat and electricity derived from woody feedstocks that would prevail in the future as a commercial-level conversion technology for wood-based ethanol production are still under development. Society in general is positive about the use of woody feedstocks for bioenergy development. The production cost of wood-based ethanol and electricity generation has not reduced over time, indicating a need for targeted policy support focusing on sharing the production cost of wood-based bioenergy products. Wood-based bioenergy development could meet the need for sustainable energy production without affecting existing roundwood markets with the advent of advanced silvicultural treatments and efficient biotechnologies.

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2019-10-05
2024-06-12
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