1932

Abstract

The economics of human nutrition has changed greatly in recent years as researchers have moved beyond supply and demand of specific foods and total calories to functional aspects of diet quality, such as nutrient composition, sustainability, and a variety of credence attributes. New kinds of data and methods allow researchers to focus on beneficial or harmful attributes of dietary patterns and the cost-effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving health through diet. This review describes some of the recent literature in nutrition economics and its implications for food policy around the world. The new economics of nutrition is benefiting from a strong foundation in the behavioral and social sciences, building on evidence from the natural and health sciences to address fundamental aspects of human well-being and sustainable development.

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2019-10-05
2024-06-15
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