1932

Abstract

In urban areas around the world, increasing motorization and growing travel demand make the urban transportation sector an ever-greater contributor to local air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. The situation is particularly acute in developing countries, where growing metropolitan regions suffer some of the world's highest levels of air pollution. Policies that seek to develop and manage this transportation sector—both to meet rising demand linked to economic growth and to safeguard the environment and human health—have had strikingly different results, with some inadvertently exacerbating the traffic and pollution they seek to mitigate. This review summarizes findings in the recent literature on the impacts of a host of urban transportation policies used in both developed- and developing-country settings. The article identifies research challenges and future areas of study regarding transportation policies, which can have important, long-lasting impacts on urban life and global climate change.

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2020-10-06
2024-04-20
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