1932

Abstract

One-carbon (1C) metabolism comprises a series of interlinking metabolic pathways that include the methionine and folate cycles that are central to cellular function, providing 1C units (methyl groups) for the synthesis of DNA, polyamines, amino acids, creatine, and phospholipids. -adenosylmethionine is a potent aminopropyl and methyl donor within these cycles and serves as the principal substrate for methylation of DNA, associated proteins, and RNA. We propose that 1C metabolism functions as a key biochemical conduit between parental environment and epigenetic regulation of early development and that interindividual and ethnic variability in epigenetic-gene regulation arises because of genetic variants within 1C genes, associated epigenetic regulators, and differentially methylated target DNA sequences. We present evidence to support these propositions, drawing upon studies undertaken in humans and animals. We conclude that future studies should assess the epigenetic effects of cumulative (multigenerational) dietary imbalances contemporaneously in both parents, as this better represents the human experience.

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2019-02-15
2024-06-25
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