1932

Abstract

Bacteria are ubiquitous in the bovine uterus after parturition, but 50 years ago, cows tolerated these bacteria and few animals developed uterine disease. Now, up to 40% of dairy cattle develop postpartum uterine disease. Uterine disease causes infertility by compromising the function of not only the endometrium but also the ovary. Animals defend themselves against pathogens using tolerance and resistance mechanisms. Tolerance is the ability to limit the disease severity induced by a given pathogen burden. Resistance is the ability to limit the pathogen burden and is usually the function of immunity. Endometrial cells contribute to tolerance and have roles in innate immunity and the inflammatory response to pathogens. However, failures in endometrial tolerance and the character of the inflammatory response shape postpartum uterine disease. We propose that uterine health is more dependent on the ability of the endometrium to tolerate pathogens than the ability to resist invading bacteria.

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2019-02-15
2024-04-18
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