1932

Abstract

Extensive knowledge gains from research worldwide over the 25 years since the discovery of chytridiomycosis can be used for improved management. Strategies that have saved populations in the short term and/or enabled recovery include captive breeding, translocation into disease refugia, translocation from resistant populations, disease-free exclosures, and preservation of disease refuges with connectivity to previous habitat, while antifungal treatments have reduced mortality rates in the wild. Increasing host resistance is the goal of many strategies under development, including vaccination and targeted genetic interventions. Pathogen-directed strategies may be more challenging but would have broad applicability. While the search for the silver bullet solution continues, we should value targeted local interventions that stop extinction and buy time for evolution of resistance or development of novel solutions. As for most invasive species and infectious diseases, we need to accept that ongoing management is necessary. For species continuing to decline, proactive deployment and assessment of promising interventions are more valid than a hands-off, do-no-harm approach that will likely allow further extinctions.

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2024-02-15
2024-04-12
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