1932

Abstract

Procedures to maintain viability of mammalian gametes and embryos in vitro, including cryopreservation, have been exceedingly valuable for my research over the past 55 years. Keeping sperm viable in vitro enables artificial insemination, which, when combined with selective breeding, often is the most effective approach to making rapid genetic change in a population. Superovulation and embryo transfer constitute a parallel approach for amplifying reproduction of female mammals. More recent developments include sexing of semen, in vitro fertilization, cloning by nuclear transfer, and genetic modification of germline cells, tools that are enabled by artificial insemination and/or embryo transfer for implementation. I have been fortunate in being able to contribute to the development of many of the above techniques, and to use them for research and applications for improving animal agriculture. Others have built on this work to circumvent human infertility, assist reproduction of companion animals, and rescue endangered species. It also has been a privilege to teach, mentor, and be mentored in this area. Resulting worldwide friendships have enriched me personally and professionally.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-animal-062521-090427
2022-02-15
2024-06-24
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