1932

Abstract

Microbial communities associated with deep-sea animals are critical to the establishment of novel biological communities in unusual environments. Over the past few decades, rapid exploration of the deep sea has enabled the discovery of novel microbial communities, some of which form symbiotic relationships with animal hosts. Symbiosis in the deep sea changes host physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution over time and space. Symbiont diversity within a host is often aligned with diverse metabolic pathways that broaden the environmental niche for the animal host. In this review, we focus on microbiomes and obligate symbionts found in different deep-sea habitats and how they facilitate survival of the organisms that live in these environments. In addition, we discuss factors that govern microbiome diversity, host specificity, and biogeography in the deep sea. Finally, we highlight the current limitations of microbiome research and draw a road map for future directions to advance our knowledge of microbiomes in the deep sea.

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2022-02-15
2024-06-20
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