1932

Abstract

Brain development is impaired by maternal exposure to airborne toxins from ambient air pollution, cigarette smoke, and lead. Shared postnatal consequences include gray matter deficits and abnormal behaviors as well as elevated blood pressure. These unexpectedly broad convergences have implications for later life brain health because these same airborne toxins accelerate brain aging. Gene-environment interactions are shown for alleles that influence the risk of Alzheimer disease. The multigenerational trace of these toxins extends before fertilization because egg cells are formed in the grandmaternal uterus. The lineage and sex-specific effects of grandmaternal exposure to lead and cigarettes indicate epigenetic processes of relevance to future generations from our current and recent exposure to airborne toxins.

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2020-12-15
2024-06-14
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